Brief facts about the regulations for mercury

Mercury is one of the most hazardous environmental toxins and constitutes a threat to both the environment and human health. It is a volatile metal that can be airborne over long distances. Mercury cannot be degraded but accumulates in soil, water and living organisms. It is therefore essential that the use and emission of mercury is reduced.

Regulations on mercury

Mercury is a volatile metal that can be airborne over long distances. Mercury cannot be degraded but accumulates in soil, water and living organisms. It is therefore essential that the use and emission of mercury is reduced.

Read more about mercury

General ban on mercury in Sweden

Since 2009 Sweden has had a general ban on placing mercury and articles containing mercury on the Swedish market in order to minimise the emissions to the environment.

Mercury means mercury and compounds and mixtures in which mercury has been used or added. Mercury may not be

  • placed on the Swedish market
  • professionally transferred out of Sweden
  • used in Sweden.

Articles containing mercury means articles and equipment where mercury is used or has been added. Articles containing mercury may not be

  • placed on the Swedish market
  • professionally transferred out of Sweden.

Articles containing mercury that are already in use may continue to be used. That said, such articles may not be placed on the market or be professionally transferred out of Sweden.

Exemptions from the general ban

Certain uses of mercury that are covered by harmonised EU regulations are exempted from the Swedish ban. EU law therefore takes precedence over national regulations, which means that mercury may be used in certain cases despite the general ban in Sweden. Examples of such use are batteries (the Batteries Directive), light sources and other electrical and electronic products (the RoHS Directive) and certain measuring instruments (the REACH Regulation) where limited concentrations of mercury may be present.

The Swedish Chemicals Agency’s Regulations (KIFS 2017:7) also include certain exemptions from the Swedish ban. Several of these exemptions are time-limited and allow certain uses of mercury in analytical chemicals and in certain measuring instruments. Also certain uses of dental amalgam is allowed up to 30 June 2018 on condition that a record is kept in accordance with the Regulations.

In addition to these exemptions from the general ban, the Swedish Chemicals Agency may grant a dispensation in individual cases.

You can find further information on how to apply for dispensation here.

Export ban on mercury from the EU

As of 2011 the EU Regulation on Mercury has prohibited all EU countries from exporting metallic mercury, certain mercury compounds and mixtures. The Regulation also contains provisions on the safe storage and disposal of metallic mercury considered to be waste, as well as provisions on how to dispose of waste mercury in a way that is safe to health and the environment.

You can find further information on the EU Regulation on Mercury here.

A new Regulation on Mercury in 2018

On 1 January 2018 a new Regulation on Mercury came into force within the EU: (EU) 2017/852. This Regulation implements the Minamata Convention on mercury and regulates the use of mercury in a number of different areas. The EU export ban has been supplemented with an import ban on mercury and mercury mixtures. Certain specified products to which mercury has been added may not be exported, imported or manufactured. Furthermore, the use of amalgam is restricted; there are also requirements that dental clinics making use of dental amalgam or those using amalgam in fillings must have an amalgam separator installed.

The Regulation also regulates the use of mercury in industrial operations, the storage of waste mercury, etc.

You can read the new Regulation on Mercury in its entirety.

The Minamata convention – a global convention

The Minamata Convention on mercury will restrict and prohibit mercury in both products and industrial processes as of 2020. The Convention was signed in 2013 and came into force in August 2017.

Further information on the Minamata Convention

About mercury – information at other authorities

There are several Swedish government authorities that are responsible in their respective fields for issues relating to mercury.

The Swedish National Food Agency

The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency

The Swedish Energy Agency

The Swedish Work Environment Authority

The Swedish Medical Products Agency

The National Board of Health and Welfare

The County Administrative Boards of Sweden

The Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions